SQL-Developer: Activate logging

In case you want to activate logging in SQL-Developer – here is how:

  1. Close all open SQL-Developer instances.
  2. Find the “sqldeveloper.conf” file
    1. Windows:
      1. goto the directory where the SQL-Developer program is installed.
      2. goto the subdirectory “sqldeveloper\bin”
    2. Mac OS X:
      1. goto your applications folder (“/Applications”)
      2. open the SQLDeveloper-App via context menu (“right mouse click”)
      3. goto the subdirectory “Contents/Resources/sqldeveloper/sqldeveloper/bin”
  3. Open the file “sqldeveloper.conf” with the text editor of your choise.
  4. Deactivate the following line by adding a “#” at the beginning:
    #IncludeConfFile sqldeveloper-nondebug.conf
  5. Add a new line with the following text to the file:
    IncludeConfFile sqldeveloper-debug.conf
    AddVMOption -Dcom.methodr.loglevel=all

  6. Save the file.

SQL-Developer: How to prevent the “Java Heap Space” error

When you are working with a lot of worksheets and reports or try to open large SQL files, you may run into “Java Heap Space” errors.

To fix this problem you need to increase the Xmx (maximum heap size).

Here is how:

  1. Close all open SQL-Developer instances.
  2. Find the “sqldeveloper.conf” file
    1. Windows:
      1. goto the directory where the SQL-Developer program is installed.
      2. goto the subdirectory “sqldeveloper\bin”
    2. Mac OS X:
      1. goto your applications folder (“/Applications”)
      2. open the SQLDeveloper-App via context menu (“right mouse click”)
      3. goto the subdirectory “Contents/Resources/sqldeveloper/sqldeveloper/bin”
  3. Open the file “sqldeveloper.conf” with the text editor of your choise.
  4. Add a new line with the following text to the file:
    AddVMOption -Xmx1024M
  5. Save the file.

SQL-Developer: How to change the date format of the result grid – “Why does my date column have no time?”

You can decide how SQL-Developer display date and timestamp columns.

  1. Go to the “Tools” menu and open “Preferences…”
  2. In the tree on the left open the “Database” branch and select “NLS”
  3. Now change the entries “Date Format”, “Timestamp Format” and “Timestamp TZ Format” as you wish!

ISO formated output with date and time

  • Date Format: YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS
  • Timestamp Format: YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SSXFF
  • Timestamp TZ Format: YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SSXFF TZR

Image

The result looks like this:

Image

German format for date and time

  • Date Format: YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS
  • Timestamp Format: YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SSXFF
  • Timestamp TZ Format: YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SSXFF TZR

Image

The result looks like this:

Image

Just choose any format you like.

Date format elements

Element Description
Punctuation and quoted text is reproduced in the result.
/
,
.
;
:
“text”
AD AD indicator with or without periods.
A.D.
AM Meridian indicator with or without periods.
A.M.
BC BC indicator with or without periods.
B.C.
CC Century.
SCC
If the last 2 digits of a 4-digit year are between 01 and 99 (inclusive), then the century is one greater than the first 2 digits of that year.
If the last 2 digits of a 4-digit year are 00, then the century is the same as the first 2 digits of that year.
For example, 2002 returns 21; 2000 returns 20.
D Day of week (1-7). This element depends on the NLS territory of the session.
DAY Name of day.
DD Day of month (1-31).
DDD Day of year (1-366).
DL Returns a value in the long date format, which is an extension of the Oracle Database DATE format, determined by the current value of the NLS_DATE_FORMAT parameter. Makes the appearance of the date components (day name, month number, and so forth) depend on the NLS_TERRITORY and NLS_LANGUAGE parameters. For example, in the AMERICAN_AMERICA locale, this is equivalent to specifying the format ‘fmDay,Monthdd,yyyy’. In the GERMAN_GERMANY locale, it is equivalent to specifying the format ‘fmDay, dd.Month yyyy‘.
Restriction: You can specify this format only with the TS element, separated by white space.
DS Returns a value in the short date format. Makes the appearance of the date components (day name, month number, and so forth) depend on the NLS_TERRITORY and NLS_LANGUAGE parameters. For example, in the AMERICAN_AMERICA locale, this is equivalent to specifying the format ‘MM/DD/RRRR‘. In the ENGLISH_UNITED_KINGDOM locale, it is equivalent to specifying the format ‘DD/MM/RRRR‘.
Restriction: You can specify this format only with the TS element, separated by white space.
DY Abbreviated name of day.
E Abbreviated era name (Japanese Imperial, ROC Official, and Thai Buddha calendars).
EE Full era name (Japanese Imperial, ROC Official, and Thai Buddha calendars).
FF [1..9] Fractional seconds; no radix character is printed. Use the X format element to add the radix character. Use the numbers 1 to 9 after FF to specify the number of digits in the fractional second portion of the datetime value returned. If you do not specify a digit, then Oracle Database uses the precision specified for the datetime data type or the data type’s default precision. Valid in timestamp and interval formats, but not in DATE formats.
Examples: ‘HH:MI:SS.FF’
SELECT TO_CHAR(SYSTIMESTAMP, ‘SS.FF3’) from DUAL;
FM Returns a value with no leading or trailing blanks.
See Also: Additional discussion on this format model modifier in the Oracle Database SQL Language Reference
FX Requires exact matching between the character data and the format model.
See Also: Additional discussion on this format model modifier in the Oracle Database SQL Language Reference
HH Hour of day (1-12).
HH12
HH24 Hour of day (0-23).
IW Week of year (1-52 or 1-53) based on the ISO standard.
IYY Last 3, 2, or 1 digit(s) of ISO year.
IY
I
IYYY 4-digit year based on the ISO standard.
J Julian day; the number of days since January 1, 4712 BC. Number specified with J must be integers.
MI Minute (0-59).
MM Month (01-12; January = 01).
MON Abbreviated name of month.
MONTH Name of month.
PM Meridian indicator with or without periods.
P.M.
Q Quarter of year (1, 2, 3, 4; January – March = 1).
RM Roman numeral month (I-XII; January = I).
RR Lets you store 20th century dates in the 21st century using only two digits.
RRRR Round year. Accepts either 4-digit or 2-digit input. If 2-digit, provides the same return as RR. If you do not want this functionality, then enter the 4-digit year.
SS Second (0-59).
SSSSS Seconds past midnight (0-86399).
TS Returns a value in the short time format. Makes the appearance of the time components (hour, minutes, and so forth) depend on the NLS_TERRITORY and NLS_LANGUAGE initialization parameters.
Restriction: You can specify this format only with the DL or DS element, separated by white space.
TZD Daylight saving information. The TZD value is an abbreviated time zone string with daylight saving information. It must correspond with the region specified in TZR. Valid in timestamp and interval formats, but not in DATE formats.
Example: PST (for US/Pacific standard time); PDT (for US/Pacific daylight time).
TZH Time zone hour. (See TZM format element.) Valid in timestamp and interval formats, but not in DATE formats.
Example: ‘HH:MI:SS.FFTZH:TZM’.
TZM Time zone minute. (See TZH format element.) Valid in timestamp and interval formats, but not in DATE formats.
Example: ‘HH:MI:SS.FFTZH:TZM’.
TZR Time zone region information. The value must be one of the time zone region names supported in the database. Valid in timestamp and interval formats, but not in DATE formats.
Example: US/Pacific
WW Week of year (1-53) where week 1 starts on the first day of the year and continues to the seventh day of the year.
W Week of month (1-5) where week 1 starts on the first day of the month and ends on the seventh.
X Local radix character.
Example: ‘HH:MI:SSXFF’.
Y,YYY Year with comma in this position.
YEAR Year, spelled out; S prefixes BC dates with a minus sign (-).
SYEAR
YYYY 4-digit year; S prefixes BC dates with a minus sign.
SYYYY
YYY Last 3, 2, or 1 digit(s) of year.
YY
Y

SQL-Developer: Speed up program start

Starting SQL-Developer takes too long?

Here’s what you can do:

1. Use native look and feel

  1. Select “Tools/Preferences” from the main menu.
  2. Select “Environment” in the list on the left.
  3. Set “Look and Feel:” to the operation system you use.

2. Disable unneeded extensions

  1. Select “Tools/Preferences” from the main menu.
  2. Select “Extensions” in the list on the left.
  3. Unselect all extensions that you don’t need. Look for unneeded “Migrations”, “Spatial”, “TimesTen” and others.

Here’s my current configuration:

3. Optimize your virus scanner

Some virus scanners are slowing down the start of SQL-Developer by several minutes!
The reason for this is that SQL-Developer is a Java based program and consists of several large “.jar”-archives, which are just “.zip”-archives with another ending. When SQL-Developer gets started, several “.jar”-archives are accessed and some virus scanners will scan the whole “.jar”-archives, even when only one small file in it is accessed.

There is no easy workaround but here are some options:
(What ever you choose may affect your security – so be careful!)

  • Add the directory where you have installed SQL-Developer from virus scans.
  • Optimize your virus scanner to not always scan this directory.
  • Optimize your virus scanners handling of “.jar”-archives/Java programs.

SQL-Developer: Migrate settings files (settings, code templates, snippets, connections etc.)

If you, like me, have a lot of personal settings, code templates, snippets, connections etc. in SQL-Developer, you may want to migrate them to a new version or another computer from time to time. Here are the most important configuration files of SQL-Developer for migrations and backup:

User dependent files

  • Code templates:
    %USERPROFILE%\Application Data\SQL Developer\CodeTemplate.xml
  • Snippets:
    %USERPROFILE%\Application Data\SQL Developer\UserSnippets.xml
  • SQL history:
    %USERPROFILE%\Application Data\SQL Developer\SqlHistory.xml

SQL-Developer version dependent files

The numbers in the following paths vary with the version of SQL-Developer you have installed!
Please look for the appropriate directories of your installation.

  • Accelerators:
    %USERPROFILE%\Application Data\SQL Developer\system3.0.04.34\o.ide.11.1.1.4.37.59.31\settings.xml
  • Connections:
    %USERPROFILE%\Application Data\SQL Developer\system3.0.04.34\o.jdeveloper.db.connection.11.1.1.4.37.59.31\connections.xml
  • Syntax highlights:
    %USERPROFILE%\Application Data\SQL Developer\system3.0.04.34\o.sqldeveloper.11.1.2.4.34\product-preferences.xml